Home Study Guides Complete Study Guide

Spiritual Five Finger Food

Five conditions for a successful method:


Basic Principles
(Most principles are explained in depth in the FAQ-Section)
1) The methodology has to be biblical.
2) The methodology has to be culturally and socially adapted.
a) We choose an oral method, because Central Asian people groups are used to receiving important information orally.
b) As time goes on we will read stories of the Holy Scripture in chronological order stories of the Holy Scripture.
c) We work mainly with stories, because people understand them more easily.
d) The texts have been chosen based on Central Asian traditions.
(Which bridges do exist and which barriers do exist?)
3) We pay for our study guide, because we use no sponsor, (minimum one per group). The printout costs less than a dollar for two or three years of study.
4) Other people can repeat and use our methodology independently.
5) History shows that Christians in many countries were or are persecuted. Therefore a good methodology has to be able to resist persecution.

Additional principles
a) When we read a text we look for the connections backwards but never for the connections forwards. (Future texts are not expected to be known, therefore all participants in the group are equal regardless of their knowledge.
b) Тhe leader of the group speaks for a maximum of 20-% of the time. (It is not a sermon. People should discover the spiritual treasures themselves.)



Application for today

Or instead of fingers 4 and 5 we ask seven questions:

  • What did you like in this story?
  • What confused you or bothered you in this story?
  • What did you learn about God?
  • What did you learn about man?
  • What should you obey from this story?
  • How will you remember this story?
  • [Note: The best answer to this question is to tell the story.]
  • To whom will you tell this story?

For a good group evening you need five elements:


Sharing the Good News

There is the list and a small commentary.

1) Genesis 1:1-2:3 Creation of the world
2) Genesis 3:1-24 The fall of man
3) Genesis 4:1-16 Cain and Abel
4) Genesis 6:5-7:6+8:13-22 Noah and the flood
5) Genesis 12:1-9 The call of Abram, 1. repetition
6) Genesis 18:1-33 Abraham pleads for Sodom
7) Genesis 20:1-7 + 22:1-19 Abraham tested
8) Exodus3:1-22 Moses and the burning Bush
9) Exodus12:21-42 The Passover and the Exodus
10) Exodus19:16-20:21 At Mount Sinai and the Ten Commandments
2. repetition
11) John 1:19-42(51) Jesus the Lamb of God
22) Mark 4:35-5:20 The healing of a demon-possessed man
13) John 11:1-46 The death of Lazarus
14) Mark 14:12-25 The Lord?s Supper
15) Mark 15:20-46 The crucifixion
16) Luke 24:1-35 The resurrection; 3. repetition


Important note: The quotations from the letters of the New Testament are mentioned so that the leader may understand the text better. Chronological Good Book-Study always looks backward but never forward. This means it looks for connections with texts already read, but not for connections to texts not yet read or other texts from the Holy Scripture.
Only key moments are mentioned, the participants will discover many other moments for themselves.

1. Adam and Eve (Genesis 2:1-3:24)
Important Points:

  • God created everything; He created all kinds of animals and plants.
  • God created the sun, the moon and the stars to mark the seasons.
  • We are the likeness and image of God.
  • Adam was in a perfect relationship with God in the Garden. He saw God, talked with God and knew what God was like.
  • God commanded Adam not to eat of the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. God told him that on the day that he ate from it he would die.
  • Satan tempted Eve, and she ate of the forbidden fruit and offered it to Adam. He ate of it also. Immediately they felt shame, tried to cover their nakedness and hid from God.
  • Adam and Eve did not die physically that day. However they were cast out of the Garden and separated from God that day. In Romans 3:23, the Holy Scripture tells us that the penalty of sin is death. Death means separation from God who is our life. Physical death entered the world because of sin, but the primary penalty of sin is that it separates us from God.
  • Adam and Eve’s attempt to cover their shame was useless. But God killed an animal and covered them in animal skin.

Summary: Sin produces death. Death means separation from God who is our life.

2. Cain and Abel Genesis 4:1-16
Important points:

  • Cain and Abel brought offerings/sacrifices before the Lord. Cain was a farmer so he brought produce from his fields. Abel was a shepherd so he brought an animal sacrifice.
  • God was pleased with Abel’s sacrifice, which was a blood sacrifice. He was not pleased with Cain’s bloodless offering. God showed that He required a blood sacrifice.
  • Rather than learn from this experience regarding what kind of offering God required, Cain became jealous and killed his brother.
  • Cain’s sin and rebellion caused him to be driven even further from the presence of the Lord.

Summary: The blood sacrifice that Abel brought established the requirement of a blood sacrifice until the coming of Jesus. (See Hebrews 9:22;10:14) Sin brings death which is separation from God.

3. Noah Genesis chapters 6-8
Important points:

  • Once man was separated from the presence of God, Satan began to flood the earth with false ideas about who God is and what He requires of man. (see John 8:44)
  • 12:9) The wickedness of man became so great that God decided to destroy mankind.
  • God chose to spare Noah and his family because Noah was a just man.
  • God told Noah to build an ark (a huge box that would float) because He was going to destroy the inhabitants of the earth by a flood.
  • Noah obeyed God and built the ark.
  • When God flooded the earth, Noah and his family were lifted by the ark above God?s watery judgement against wicked and unbelieving mankind.

Summary: Sin brings judgement and death. Those who believe God and apply His appointed means of deliverance will be saved from God’s judgement upon sin.

4. Abraham Genesis chapters 12-22
Important points:

  • To counter the false ideas about God that Satan had flooded the world with, God chose to raise up a people through whom He would reveal what He is like and what He requires of man.
  • God chose Abraham as the father of His people.
  • God told Abraham that He would give him multitudes of physical descendants, and through his descendants, God would bless all the families of the earth. So Abraham believed God and followed Him to the land of Canaan.
  • Abraham and his wife Sarah had grown very old (physically too old to have a child) and they still had no child through whom God could give Abraham many descendants. But one night, God took Abraham outside and showed him the stars in the sky and told him that the number of his descendants would be like the stars. Abraham believed God and it was counted unto him for righteousness.
  • When Abraham was 100 years old, God gave him a son named Isaac. This was the son that God had promised.
  • Later, God commanded Abraham to go and offer Isaac as a sacrifice to God. Abraham obeyed God, but before he could put the knife to Isaac the Angel of the Lord stopped him. God provided a ram for the sacrifice instead of Isaac.

Summary: God wants us to know what He is like and what he requires of us. In Abraham we see that right standing before God requires faith. (See Romans 4:1-5) Also we see that God would not allow Abraham to offer his son as a sacrifice. God provided a substitute. But one day God would offer His Son Who would be the substitute for all people of faith. (See John 3:16)

5. Moses Exodus chapters 12-20
Important points:

  • God’s people were sent to Egypt. They were treated kindly there at first, but later they were made to be slaves and were treated harshly.
  • God raised up Moses to deliver His people from their bondage in Egypt.
  • At Moses’ command, nine terrible plagues came on Egypt, but Pharaoh would not let God’s people go.
  • God sent one final plague on Egypt – the first born of every creature was to die. God told his people that they were to sacrifice a lamb and splatter its blood on the doorposts of their houses. God would pass over the houses of those who believed in Him and applied the lamb’s blood to the doorposts and the firstborn there would not die, but live.
  • Through this last plague God delivered His people and caused them to pass from Egypt, through the Red Sea and into the wilderness.
  • God took His people to Mount Sinai and there He gave them His Law. The purpose of His Law was to reveal His righteousness and what He required of mankind.
  • Immediately after God gave Moses His commandments, He told Moses to build an altar so that when the people sinned they might bring a blood sacrifice as an offering for sin.
  • For the next 1500 years, until Jesus came, every day the people of Israel saw the penalty of sin – death!
  • Those who would be in right standing before God had to bring the offering that God required for their sin.

Summary: In the very fabric of the existence of His people Israel, God wove the picture of the blood sacrifice. The Passover feast that celebrated their deliverance from bondage reminded them of the lamb that died and became the substitute for them. The constant sacrifices for sin reminded them of the penalty of sin which was death and the animals which became the substitute for them. Those who would be in right standing before God and have their sins forgiven had to offer the proper sacrifice.

6. Jesus Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
Important points:

  • John the Baptist came to God’s people telling them the Messiah that God had promised was coming and the Kingdom of God was at hand.
  • When Jesus came to John to be baptized, John looked at Him and said, “Behold the Lamb of God that takes away the sin of the world”. Remember that God’s people had a picture burned in their minds which is this: sin produces death, which is separation from God - God provides a substitute which is a blood sacrifice - Those who believe God and offer the proper offering are restored to right standing before God. So when John said the Lamb of God they knew he meant a sacrifice. But this one, John proclaimed could take away the sin of the whole world!
  • Jesus taught the people the truth of God. In Matthew chapter five He taught us that sin is not just our outward actions, but also the thought and intents of our hearts. Just as God told Samuel when he looked at David: “The Lord looks at the heart.”
  • Jesus lived a sinless life (Hebrews 4:15) Therefore He did not owe the penalty of sin (Romans 6:23) that every descendant of Adam owes.
  • Jesus said that He came to pay the penalty of sin. He said, “The Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life as a ransom for many.” (Mark 10:45)
  • When Jesus died on the cross, He was not dying to pay for His sin, but for our sin. Right before He died, He said, “It is finished.” (John 19:30) In the original language of the New Testament this phrase translated “it is finished” was one word. It was written on a bill when the final payment was made. It meant literally “paid in full”. Jesus was saying that when He died our sin debt was paid in full.
  • God confirmed that Jesus had indeed paid our penalty for sin by raising Him from the dead. (See Romans 1:4 and Acts 17:31)

Summary: Jesus came to be the sacrifice for our sins. Jesus told us that He was going to die for our sins. Then He died for us and God confirmed that He had accepted the sacrifice of Jesus for the penalty of sin by raising Him from the dead. At this point you should be ready to confront your Muslim friend with His need to receive Jesus as Savior. Here are some verses you can use with him or her:

And He (Jesus) said to them, “Go into all the world and preach the Gospel to every creature. He who believes and is baptized shall be saved; but he who does not believe shall be condemned.” Mark 16:15-16

As many as received Him (Jesus), to them He gave the right to become children of God, to those who believe in His name. John 1:12

For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son that whosoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life. John 3:16

If you confess with your mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved. Romans 10:9


Spiritual Five Finger Food
Oral Chronological Holy Scripture Study

Important points or moments:

Important note: The quotations from the letters of the New Testament are mentioned so that the leader may understand the text better. Chronological Good Book-Study always looks backward but never forward. This means it looks for connections with texts already read, but not for connections to texts not yet read or other texts from the Holy Scripture.
Only key moments are mentioned, the participants will discover many other moments for themselves.

1. Adam and Eve (Genesis 2:1-3:24)
Important Points:

  • God created everything; He created all kinds of animals and plants.
  • God created the sun, the moon and the stars to mark the seasons.
  • We are the likeness and image of God.
  • Adam was in a perfect relationship with God in the Garden. He saw God, talked with God and knew what God was like.
  • God commanded Adam not to eat of the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. God told him that on the day that he ate from it he would die.
  • Satan tempted Eve, and she ate of the forbidden fruit and offered it to Adam. He ate of it also. Immediately they felt shame, tried to cover their nakedness and hid from God.
  • Adam and Eve did not die physically that day. However they were cast out of the Garden and separated from God that day. In Romans 3:23, the Holy Scripture tells us that the penalty of sin is death. Death means separation from God who is our life. Physical death entered the world because of sin, but the primary penalty of sin is that it separates us from God.
  • Adam and Eve’s attempt to cover their shame was useless. But God killed an animal and covered them in animal skin.

Summary: Sin produces death. Death means separation from God who is our life.

2. Cain and Abel Genesis 4:1-16
Important points:

  • Cain and Abel brought offerings/sacrifices before the Lord. Cain was a farmer so he brought produce from his fields. Abel was a shepherd so he brought an animal sacrifice.
  • God was pleased with Abel’s sacrifice, which was a blood sacrifice. He was not pleased with Cain’s bloodless offering. God showed that He required a blood sacrifice.
  • Rather than learn from this experience regarding what kind of offering God required, Cain became jealous and killed his brother.
  • Cain’s sin and rebellion caused him to be driven even further from the presence of the Lord.

Summary: The blood sacrifice that Abel brought established the requirement of a blood sacrifice until the coming of Jesus. (See Hebrews 9:22;10:14) Sin brings death which is separation from God.

3. Noah Genesis chapters 6-8
Important points:

  • Once man was separated from the presence of God, Satan began to flood the earth with false ideas about who God is and what He requires of man. (see John 8:44)
  • 12:9) The wickedness of man became so great that God decided to destroy mankind.
  • God chose to spare Noah and his family because Noah was a just man.
  • God told Noah to build an ark (a huge box that would float) because He was going to destroy the inhabitants of the earth by a flood.
  • Noah obeyed God and built the ark.
  • When God flooded the earth, Noah and his family were lifted by the ark above God?s watery judgement against wicked and unbelieving mankind.

Summary: Sin brings judgement and death. Those who believe God and apply His appointed means of deliverance will be saved from God’s judgement upon sin.

4. Abraham Genesis chapters 12-22
Important points:

  • To counter the false ideas about God that Satan had flooded the world with, God chose to raise up a people through whom He would reveal what He is like and what He requires of man.
  • God chose Abraham as the father of His people.
  • God told Abraham that He would give him multitudes of physical descendants, and through his descendants, God would bless all the families of the earth. So Abraham believed God and followed Him to the land of Canaan.
  • Abraham and his wife Sarah had grown very old (physically too old to have a child) and they still had no child through whom God could give Abraham many descendants. But one night, God took Abraham outside and showed him the stars in the sky and told him that the number of his descendants would be like the stars. Abraham believed God and it was counted unto him for righteousness.
  • When Abraham was 100 years old, God gave him a son named Isaac. This was the son that God had promised.
  • Later, God commanded Abraham to go and offer Isaac as a sacrifice to God. Abraham obeyed God, but before he could put the knife to Isaac the Angel of the Lord stopped him. God provided a ram for the sacrifice instead of Isaac.

Summary: God wants us to know what He is like and what he requires of us. In Abraham we see that right standing before God requires faith. (See Romans 4:1-5) Also we see that God would not allow Abraham to offer his son as a sacrifice. God provided a substitute. But one day God would offer His Son Who would be the substitute for all people of faith. (See John 3:16)

5. Moses Exodus chapters 12-20
Important points:

  • God’s people were sent to Egypt. They were treated kindly there at first, but later they were made to be slaves and were treated harshly.
  • God raised up Moses to deliver His people from their bondage in Egypt.
  • At Moses’ command, nine terrible plagues came on Egypt, but Pharaoh would not let God’s people go.
  • God sent one final plague on Egypt – the first born of every creature was to die. God told his people that they were to sacrifice a lamb and splatter its blood on the doorposts of their houses. God would pass over the houses of those who believed in Him and applied the lamb’s blood to the doorposts and the firstborn there would not die, but live.
  • Through this last plague God delivered His people and caused them to pass from Egypt, through the Red Sea and into the wilderness.
  • God took His people to Mount Sinai and there He gave them His Law. The purpose of His Law was to reveal His righteousness and what He required of mankind.
  • Immediately after God gave Moses His commandments, He told Moses to build an altar so that when the people sinned they might bring a blood sacrifice as an offering for sin.
  • For the next 1500 years, until Jesus came, every day the people of Israel saw the penalty of sin – death!
  • Those who would be in right standing before God had to bring the offering that God required for their sin.

Summary: In the very fabric of the existence of His people Israel, God wove the picture of the blood sacrifice. The Passover feast that celebrated their deliverance from bondage reminded them of the lamb that died and became the substitute for them. The constant sacrifices for sin reminded them of the penalty of sin which was death and the animals which became the substitute for them. Those who would be in right standing before God and have their sins forgiven had to offer the proper sacrifice.

6. Jesus Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
Important points:

  • John the Baptist came to God’s people telling them the Messiah that God had promised was coming and the Kingdom of God was at hand.
  • When Jesus came to John to be baptized, John looked at Him and said, “Behold the Lamb of God that takes away the sin of the world”. Remember that God’s people had a picture burned in their minds which is this: sin produces death, which is separation from God - God provides a substitute which is a blood sacrifice - Those who believe God and offer the proper offering are restored to right standing before God. So when John said the Lamb of God they knew he meant a sacrifice. But this one, John proclaimed could take away the sin of the whole world!
  • Jesus taught the people the truth of God. In Matthew chapter five He taught us that sin is not just our outward actions, but also the thought and intents of our hearts. Just as God told Samuel when he looked at David: “The Lord looks at the heart.”
  • Jesus lived a sinless life (Hebrews 4:15) Therefore He did not owe the penalty of sin (Romans 6:23) that every descendant of Adam owes.
  • Jesus said that He came to pay the penalty of sin. He said, “The Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life as a ransom for many.” (Mark 10:45)
  • When Jesus died on the cross, He was not dying to pay for His sin, but for our sin. Right before He died, He said, “It is finished.” (John 19:30) In the original language of the New Testament this phrase translated “it is finished” was one word. It was written on a bill when the final payment was made. It meant literally “paid in full”. Jesus was saying that when He died our sin debt was paid in full.

• God confirmed that Jesus had indeed paid our penalty for sin by raising Him from the dead. (See Romans 1:4 and Acts 17:31)
Summary: Jesus came to be the sacrifice for our sins. Jesus told us that He was going to die for our sins. Then He died for us and God confirmed that He had accepted the sacrifice of Jesus for the penalty of sin by raising Him from the dead. At this point you should be ready to confront your Muslim friend with His need to receive Jesus as Savior. Here are some verses you can use with him or her:

And He (Jesus) said to them, “Go into all the world and preach the Gospel to every creature. He who believes and is baptized shall be saved; but he who does not believe shall be condemned.” Mark 16:15-16

As many as received Him (Jesus), to them He gave the right to become children of God, to those who believe in His name. John 1:12

For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son that whosoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life. John 3:16

If you confess with your mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved. Romans 10:9

7) The Book of Acts of the Apostles
The Book of Acts 1:1-11 and 2:1-13. Jesus appears to His followers and tells them to wait for the Holy Spirit to come and empower them to be His witnesses. Then He ascends into heaven. The Holy Spirit comes upon the disciples

The Book of Acts 2:14-47. The Holy Spirit comes upon the disciples and they preach with power and in languages they do not know. Peter preaches and 3000 people are saved and baptized in one day. The first Church is formed and we see what it is like.

The Book of Acts 3.  A lame man is healed and Peter uses the opportunity to tell the good news of the forgiveness of sins and eternal life.

The Book of Acts 4.  The religious leaders in Jerusalem begin to stand up against the preaching of the good news.

The Book of Acts 5:12-42. Persecution (from the religious leaders) begins to rise up against the young Church in Jerusalem.
The Book of Acts 6:1-7. Difficulties come, and deacons are chosen to help and serve.

The Book of Acts 10. Peter is commanded by God to take the good news of Jesus to a Gentile named Cornelius. Cornelius and his household believe in Jesus and are baptized. The door is thus opened to take the good news of forgiveness of sins and the gift of eternal life in Jesus into the whole world
The Book of Acts 13:1-12. Paul and Barnabas are called to ministry. The church sends out the first missionaries.

Spiritual Five Finger Food

Oral Chronological Holy Scripture Study

Leadership-level

List of leadership texts

1) Exodus 4:1-31 Signs for Moses and his return (+ Repetition Exodus 2 +3 Birth of Moses and his calling, may be next session)
2) Exodus 5: 1-6:1 Moses before Pharaoh (+ Repetition Exodus 2+3)
3) Exodus 17:1-16 Water from the rock and the Amalekites + Repetition Exodus 12:21-42 +13:20-14:31 Passover and crossing the sea
4) Exodus 18:1-27 Jethro visits Moses
5) Deuteronomy 9:8-10:5 The golden calf and Moses? intercession
6) Numbers 13:1-33 Exploring Canaan (It is not necessary to know all the names, only Caleb and Joshua are necessary)
7) Numbers 14:1-38 The people rebel
8) Numbers 27:12-23 Joshua to Succeed Moses 1. Repetition
9) 1. Samuel 16:1-13 +17:1-11 Samuel anoints David and a challenge
10) 1. Samuel 17:12-53 +18:1-3 David and Goliath + David and Jonathan become friends
11) 1. Samuel 23:14-24:23 Saul pursues David
12) 2. Samuel 7:1-17(29) God’s promise to David
13) 2. Samuel 11:1-27 David and Bathsheba
14) 2. Samuel 12:1-15 Nathan rebukes David
15) 2. Samuel 13:1-39 Amnon and Tamar and Absalom Kills Amnon
16) 2. Samuel 14:23-15:14 Absaloms conspiracy
17) 1. Konige 2:1-11 David?s death 2. Repetition
18) Nehemiah 1:1-11 Nehemiah?s prayer
19) Nehemiah 2:1-20 Artaxerxes sends Nehemiah to Jerusalem and Nehemiah inspects the wall
20) Nehemiah 4:1-23 Opposition to the rebuilding
21) Nehemiah 5:1-19 Nehemiah helps the poor
22) Nehemiah 6-7:3 +12:27 Further opposition to the rebuilding and the completion of the wall 3. Repetition
23) Matthew 4:18-25 The calling of the first disciples and Jesus heals the sick
24) Mark 6:30-52 Jesus feeds the five thousand
25) Luke 10:25-42 The Parable of the good Samaritan + Mary and Martha
26) John 10:7-15 + 27 The shepherd and his flock
27) Matthew 19:27-20:16 The Parable of the Workers in the Vineyard
28) Matthew 20:17-28 A Mother’s Request + reminder for lessons 38-40
29) Matthew 23:1-23:13 ( or till 23:36) Woes to the Pharisees
30) Matthew 25:1-30 The Parable of the Ten Virgins and the Parable of the Talents
31) John 13:1-38 or 13:1-20 + 34-35 Jesus washes His disciples feet
32) Mark 14:27-72 Jesus in Getsemane and before the Sanhedrin
33) John 21:1-20 Jesus and the Miraculous catch of fish + 4. Repetition
34) Acts 8:4-25 Simon the Sorcerer
35) Acts 8:26-40 Philip and the Ethiopian + Repetition Luke 24:36-53 Jesus appears to His Disciples
36) Acts 9:1-31 Conversion of Saul
37) Acts 11:1-18 Peter explains his action + Repetition Acts 10:1-18 Peter and Cornelius
38) Acts 11:19-30 The Church in Antioch
5. Repetition
39-40) Develop your idea of leadership. Describe it in a way that it can be passed on orally. Look also at the five criteria for a good method. Use a picture like the Good Shepherd, or a key story like Jesus washing the feet of His disciples, or something like 10 fingers of leadership, 10 commandments for leaders or a key verse like Acts 1:8. Present your idea and analyze together the strength and the weaknesses and think about how to improve these ideas.

The material for starting a new church or a new group has not been published yet.

If you want to translate this material into another language or if you want to contact the author, please click on.
If you want to know more about the methodology, go to FAQ